Dijon BBQ Chicken Freezer Meal

Dijon BBQ Chicken Freezer Meal

Freezer meals are great for back to school.  We are so busy during the school year that these freezer meals will keep on track to eating healthy. Here’s an easy grilling freezer meal.

Dijon BBQ Chicken Freezer Meal

Ingredients:

1.5 lb chicken breast (thin cuts) (boneless / skinless)
1/2 cup Dijon mustard
1 juice from a whole Lemon
3 Tbsp white wine vinegar (or champagne)
4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp fresh thyme
1 tsp fresh or dried Rosemary (crush with hands)
Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Place all ingredients into a freezer gallon bag.
  2. Put in a bowl to defrost and marinate.
  3. Remove from marinating bag and grill chicken thighs for 10 minutes on each side or until cooked. Discard the marinade.
  4. Serve with a spinach salad and grilled asparagus.

Here is the finished meal with fresh dijon and lemon mixed as a topping for the chicken.  Make a mix of dijon and lemon juice with salt and pepper to taste. And add it to the cooked chicken.

dijon mustard chicken freezer meal

Here’s the printable recipe if you want to print it.

Dijon BBQ Chicken Freezer Meal

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 4-6

Serving Size: 1 chicken breast

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb chicken breast (thin cuts) (boneless / skinless)
  • 1/2 cup Dijon mustard
  • 1 juice from a whole Lemon
  • 3 Tbsp white wine vinegar (or champagne)
  • 4 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp fresh or dried Rosemary (crush with hands)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients into a freezer gallon bag.
  2. Put in a bowl to defrost and marinate.
  3. Remove from marinating bag and grill chicken thighs for 10 minutes on each side or until cooked. Discard the marinade.
  4. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve with a spinach salad and grilled asparagus.


Please note these are affiliate links through Amazon, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn affiliate fees if you decide to make a purchase.

Tips to help your parents downsize their stuff

Tips to help your parents downsize their stuff
Last week, I started a new series about downsizing your parents. Now that you had the talk with your parents. And, they have agreed that it would be a good idea to make their lives simpler.  What’s next?  Usually, your parent has been living in their home for a while and there are probably many areas that need clearing out of their unused stuff.

Tips to help your parents downsize their stuff

First, determine what area have not been used in a while.

These areas can include the basement, attic, garages, closets in guest rooms, etc… Make a list of all these areas in order of the least frequently used.

Decide on a time frame.  

Work backward from the date you want to move and then split your tasks into reasonable times that will work for you and your parent.  Keep in mind that they may not be able to do more than 4 hours of work at a time.  Also, take into account their most active time of day.  It could be early afternoon or late morning. Remember, you will not be able to do it all for them, they will need to be involved in the process.

Now, it is time to begin this process.

We will need to review the rooms that may not be their stuff.  These are areas like kids rooms that can be done by you without their help if they don’t want to be involved. To do this, you should decide what you want to keep and get rid of. Most likely, there are many memorabilia items that need to be removed.  Ask yourself these questions to help you decide if you want to keep these items.

Questions to ask when clearing clutter in your room at your parents’ house.

  1. Does this item remind me of any happy memories that I want to remember?  Yes or No.

  2. Does this item truly add value in my home? Yes or No.

  3. Is this item useful in my home? Yes or No.

  4. Can I think of a way to use this item right now? Yes or No.

  5. Would getting rid of this item create undue stress for me or my parent? Yes or No.

If you answered NO to more than 3 of these questions, feel free to donate or recycle this item.

After you clear out your area, now it’s time to start clearing out their areas.

Pick one room they don’t visit often. Basement, attic, or guest room work great.

After you both mutually pick the room, start by reviewing what the room has in it.  

Ask your parent questions about the stuff in the room. Have them tell you about the different items. Everyone has stories to tell in their lives so make it easy for them by asking your parent what these items mean to them. A question like this works great: “Mom / Dad, where did this item come from? It’s really interesting.” Take your time and go through this area with them.  There may be heightened feelings about particular items in this space.  Take note (by writing down or marking it with a dot sticker) of any extreme feelings – positive or negative.  Those feelings will help you later determine if they will be willing to get rid of it or if you need to keep it. Dot stickers can be color coordinated to the feelings of your parent. Red could be for keep the item and green could be to donate that item.

At this point, if they feel they are done for the day, have them take a break and you can start sorting the items into keep and get rid of.

Tell them that you will do the heavy lifting and take care of the sorting of the items. They can then come back and see what you did and review the items after you are finished. This way, it will give them time to rest and not feel so overwhelmed with the actual doing.  It’s a good idea for you to have help in this process. Extra hands make the job easier and quicker. Spouses and grandkids are great helpers.

This process may take some time depending on how much stuff your parent has.  Be patient with them in the process and you too will be able to help them have a simpler life.  Please share any tips you may have learned in the process of downsizing your parents. I would love to hear from you. 


Please note these are affiliate links through Amazon, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn affiliate fees if you decide to make a purchase.

Great Apps To Help You Have A Successful College Year

Great Apps To Help With A Successful College Year

This is the first post of a school success series that is geared to different age students. This topic is near and dear to my heart. In this series, I hope to help students and their parents streamline their processes and help them make their school year that much easier to succeed. These days many schools do not teach organization options to students. So, I am going to go through various options from apps to paper management. This series will be released on Thursdays only so please come back each Thursday to check out another posts to help your children.

Here we go.

Great assignment and note-taking apps for a successful college year.

There are many students wanting to make life easier during their school year.  Below are apps that I found to be helpful. Keep in mind that each student must try the apps to truly see if it will work for them. They may want to add their class information when they get their schedule for the semester.

Keeping Track of Assignments Apps:

There are four apps that were interesting for time management and keeping track of assignments. (Note: These apps are NOT affiliates. I just thought they looked interesting and organized for a student to use.)

For Android: Studious by Brandon Young is an interesting one for people with an Android phone. It is a great way to manage your different assignments and additional information.  The app developer had a note stating: “***Do not use an app killer or task manager to kill Studious. Studious will not be able to silence your phone or give reminders if stopped by one of these applications.***”   I haven’t tried this app personally. Click above and try it to see if it will work for your student. studiousFor IOS: There are 4 homework apps I like for student assignments. The only reason I have more IOS apps is because I have access to an IOS device. Feel free to click-through and download to test out the free apps. Each app uses similar content that you will need to add.

Pocket Schedule – Class Schedule, Homework Planner & School Organizer By Appxy

pocket schedule

The Homework App – Your Class Assignment & Timetable Schedule Planner By Kerman Kohli

the homework appHomework ! By Sevenlogics, Inc. homework!ClassManager – Student School Schedule Planner Tracker & Assignment List Homework Organizer App By Satyadev Mahalingashetty

classmanager

 

Note-taking Apps:

I love using my tablet with the keyboard while on the go meeting with clients or just waiting for one of my kids.  It works great especially if you have a data line or good WiFi connection. These apps below for creating notebooks, tabs, and pages and has a great search feature to find whatever notes you want.  You can also add check boxes for easy list building too.

Here are some of the note-taking apps I enjoy using:

Microsoft OneNote App: I wrote about this app on my admin support blog for small business owners. Here is the link if you want to check it out for you. To understand how to use this app, here is a video from Microsoft on how you can use OneNote.

Evernote: I used Evernote initially and it worked well too.  It is very similar to OneNote. They have a free version just like Microsoft OneNote.  Here is the pricing for Evernote if you need more storage space.

These apps have free smartphone apps so you can edit on the go or while in class. Note: For both of these apps, you will need to set up a log in account. And there is some set up to make it the way you want it.

Tip: Set up your note-taking app on the computer and then download it on to your smartphone or tablet.  It’s must faster that way.

For college students using a PC or Mac:

Not all students feel comfortable using their small tablet or smartphone to take notes digitally. I recommend a good quality computer laptop no more than 15 inches monitor. If you can afford it, try getting a laptop that turns into a tablet.

Tip: If the professor doesn’t allow laptops note-taking in the classroom, type up the handwritten notes when you return from class. This way it will help you add any additional notes you may have forgotten when initially writing and hopefully, helps you retain even more of the information.

For laptop students, I like the Microsoft Office for Home and Student package for the PC computers. We purchased it for both our kids. While some teachers like to use Google Classroom, the Google Docs and Google Sheets does necessarily work properly all the time so having a backup way to write reports is a good idea.   

This package is for Mac users: I haven’t used this one for Mac users before but heard it works well.

I hope this helps your student get organized and have a successful college year.  Please leave a comment below if there are any apps you have tried and recommend.  I would love to hear from you.


Please note these are affiliate links through Amazon, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn affiliate fees if you decide to make a purchase.

Herb Chicken Thighs with Corn – Freezer Meal

herb chicken thighs with corn recipe #freezermeal

As school approaches, having freezer meals makes life easier during the busy school year. I will be doing a series on freezer meals to help you and your family eat healthy weeknight meals.

My first freezer meal recipe is herb chicken thighs with corn recipe.

It can be served over rice or gluten-free pasta or even a piece of bread. Here is how you make it.

Ingredients:

1.5 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs
1 10 3/4 oz Cream of mushroom soup
4 cooked corn on the cob kernels (cut off kernels)

1 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp fresh basil (you can use dried instead)
1 Tbsp dried oregano (you can use fresh instead)

Instructions:

  1. Add all the ingredients above in a gallon freezer bag. Then freeze.herb chicken thigh freezer meal
  2. When ready to cook, defrost the bag in a bowl.
  3. Preheat to 350 degrees.
  4. Spray the 13 x 9 pan with nonstick spray.
  5. Add content of the bag into the pan.uncooked herb chicken thigh
  6. Cover with foil and cook for 60 minutes or until the chicken is done.
  7. Serve over rice or any other grain you like.

Here is the finished dish:

herb chicken thighs with corn

Here’s the cooked dish. Enjoy!

herb chicken with corn freezer meal

If you want to print out the recipe, here it is below.

Herb Chicken Thighs with Corn – Freezer Meal

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 60 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Yield: 8

Serving Size: 1 thigh

Ingredients

  • 1.5 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • 1 10 3/4 oz Cream of mushroom soup
  • 4 cooked corn on the cob kernels (cut off kernels)
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbsp fresh basil (you can use dried instead)
  • 1 Tbsp dried oregano (you can use fresh instead)

Instructions

  1. Add all the ingredients above in a gallon freezer bag. Then freeze.
  2. When ready to cook, defrost the bag in a bowl.
  3. Preheat to 350 degrees.
  4. Spray the 13 x 9 pan with nonstick spray.
  5. Add content of the bag into the pan.
  6. Cover with foil and cook for 60 minutes or until the chicken is done.
  7. Serve over rice or any other grain you like.


Please note these are affiliate links through Amazon, and at no additional cost to you, I will earn affiliate fees if you decide to make a purchase.

Tips To Help Your Parents Decide if Downsizing is right for them

Tips To Help Your Parents decide if downsizing is right for them

This is a new series called: Tips to help your parents…  As the title states, this series goal is to help children simplify their parents’ lives as they reach retirement. Each Sunday, we will discuss different aspects of this process.  So, let’s begin.

First, I am using the word downsizing to describe a retired person (or anyone for that matter) who wants to get rid of their unused stuff and prefer to simplify their life. They could decide to move or just live in their well-organized home.  Not every retiree needs to move from their home if their home works effectively for them.

The first post of this series will be about how to determine if downsizing is right for your parents.

The pros and cons of downsizing your parents.

There are lots of pros and cons on downsizing your parents.  Here are the main ones.

Pros:

Making their lives easier.  We all want to make our parents feel more comfortable in their later years.

Saving money. When your parents go to social security, they may not want to work any longer.  So, minimizing their monthly expenses is definitely a plus.

Selling their home makes it easier for them to relocate to a cheaper area. This gives them more flexibility to move to a warmer climate if they choose to do so.

Cons:

It may create undue stress on your elderly parent. Not all parents like to move so keep that in mind when you approach the subject with your parent. Remember your parent may have lived in their home for decades and it may be overwhelming to think how they would get to the point where they can downsize.

The timing of your parents move can be a major pitfall. If it is a down market, it may not make sense to sell their home.

When moving your parents to a retirement community, they may not care for it. Then, you will have to revisit the topic of “where do you want to live?” again with them.

Here are some initial questions to ask your parents to determine if they would be receptive to downsize.

Bringing up the topic with your parents may be intimidating. But, with a little planning beforehand, it will help you stay focused on the topic and not on the emotional aspect of getting rid of their stuff.  Start by writing a list of yes or no questions for your parents to answer.

  • Would they consider moving if you helped them through the process and made it easier for them? Yes or No

  • Where would they want to live: Would they like to visit some retirement communities? Yes, or No Would they want to live in a smaller home? Yes, or No Would they want to stay in their immediate neighborhood? Yes, or No Would they want to move near you? Yes, or No

  • Would they be willing to get rid of stuff in their home that will make their home safer for them to move around? Yes or No

  • Would they be willing to donate, sell, or give away items (furniture pieces, household knick knacks) that are not necessary? Yes or No

These are just a few questions but hopefully, it helps inspire you to get started on your yes or no list of questions.

After you had the conversation and your parents agree to be open to the option of downsizing and moving, gather all the bills and paperwork together to see if it really would work for your parents to downsize. 

Is it cost-effective to downsize my parents?

Well, each parents’ financial situations are different. So to figure out if it is cost-effective for them to move, sit down and really look at the numbers, check out this site: “Figure Out How Moving Changes Your Finances.” Moving isn’t cheap.  And the undue stress may not make sense for your parents. So gather the information together and sit down with your parents and go through the details.  If your parents aren’t organized with their finances, this may take some doing. But be patient and do this process at their own pace.

If my parents stay at home, how can I minimize their risk?

If your parents don’t want to move or it just isn’t cost-effective, determine the extra cost that will help them live a happy and safe life in their existing home.  Here are some questions to ask:

  • Do they need a caregiver on a daily or weekly basis?

  • Do they need a 24/7 monitor system and/or security system? Places like ADT offers a Medical Alter System.

  • Does the house need to be repaired? Does the bathroom need handicap railings put in?  Does the shower need to be changed to a standing shower? Does the railing on the steps need to be reinforced?

Create a list of questions before you approach your parent to tell them about the modifications you want to make in their home. Always be respectful.  It is after all, their home.

I hope this helps you start the conversation with your parent.  Please come back next week for more tips to help you and your parent.

Have you dealt with this downsizing process with your parents?  How did it work for you?  Do you have any tips to share?  Please leave a comment below. 


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